current and future research


>Influenza Fusion Picture

Influenza

We are studying the entry mechanism of influenza virus into its host in order to gain information on the pathogenic properties of the virus. Our studies are focused on a structure-function analysis of the viral hemagglutinin (HA) and its role in virus entry and membrane fusion. In particular, we study how proteases activate the HA, and how mutations in the viral genome allow selection of distinct proteases that may allow increased spread and virulence. We also study the interaction of influenza virus with bacteria in the respiratory tract, in co-infections situations. While our work principally involves human influenza viruses, we also study avian influenza, including novel H7N9 viruses under BSL3 containment.

In collaboration with the lab of David Putnum (Dept. Biomedical Engineering) we are evaluating novel vaccine platforms for influenza virus, as well as investigating novel therapeutic options for influenza and paramyxoviruses that target host cell proteases. Our work on influenza also covers the risk assessment aspects of emerging human and avian influenza viruses, in association with single-particle imaging in the laboratory of Susan Daniel (School of Chemical Engineering).

>Corona Virus Picture

Coronavirus

Coronaviruses are major cause of disease in many animal species and have become increasingly important as human pathogens. Our studies are focused on a structure-function analysis of the viral spike (S) and its role in virus entry and membrane fusion. We study both receptor interactions as well as how proteases activate S, and how mutations in the viral genome allow selection of distinct proteases allowing increased pathogenesis. Our studies include work on Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) coronavirus under BSL3 conditions, feline coronaviruses, canine coronavirus,  and emerging coronaviruses of pigs (PEDV) and horses (EqCoV).

Ebola virus picture

Ebola

Ebola virus, along with the related Marburg virus, are filoviruses that are currently of high significance in public health. Our studies are focused on the structure-function relationship of the viral glycoprotein (GP; its role in virus entry and membrane fusion and the potential for development of new anti-viral therapeutics targeting virus fusion. This work is in collaboration with Dr. Susan Daniel (School of Chemical and Bimolecular Engineering). We study the virus as non-replicating pseudovirons, using single particle imaging, TIRF microscopy and supported lipid bilayers. Our studies also include work on the host cell proteases activating Ebola and Marburg virus GP.



Rhabdovirus Picture

Rhabdovirus

Rhabdoviruses includes many important human, animal and plant pathogens, including Rabies virus. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a prototypic virus in the Rhabdoviridae, and it is a focus of the Whittaker Lab. Using the information provided by the recent crystal structure of the VSV glycoprotein (G), we are carrying out a mutagenesis study to determine the critical amino acids within the fusion domain of VSV G, as well as a related fish rhabdovirus, viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV).

Arenavirus Picture

Arenavirus

Arenaviruses are generally rodent-transmitted disease viruses, but can cause severe illnesses in humans including hemorrhagic fever.